Careers in Biochemistry

Career Possibilities in Biochemistry
Career Possibilities in Biochemistry

Answer Exciting Questions

The conversation usually goes something like this…

“What are you going to study? What are you going to do with that major?”

We know the outcome of any college commitment is king, so we help you build versatile skills that will make you marketable, hirable and secure. We’ll help you discover your passion. So you can let your curiosity move you.

Many of our undergraduate students are interested in healthcare and go on to become physicians, pharmacists or public health specialists. Other common careers include industry, agriculture, education, or law.

Job growth in biochemistry is expected to increase 19% between 2012 and 2022 (Bureau of Labor and Statistics). This is primarily due to an increased demand in biomedical needs and climate change (biofuels/plant biotechnology). Career opportunities with the Bachelor of Science degree include entry-level positions as research technologists in biomedical, pharmaceutical and agricultural labs. You can combine communication skills with a science background to work in education, business, or government agencies.

The majority of our students pursue advanced degrees — including health professions, secondary education and the molecular life sciences. These professionals have a profound effect on our society as physicians, public policy makers, educators and researchers.

A few job titles of our graduates:

  • Physician
  • Pharmacist
  • Intellectual Property Attorney (Patent Law)
  • Chemist
  • Dental Surgeon
  • Associate Analyst
  • Research Technician
  • Professor
  • Genetic Counselor
Jeanine Von Nostrand, Ph.D.

BS ‘07

“My favorite experience at Nebraska was working in Dr. Julie Stone’s lab. I learned a tremendous amount – and gained the confidence to continue in science. I was awarded my Ph.D. from Stanford University in 2014 where I worked on human developmental diseases and helped with both treatment and prevention of cancer. The next stage of my career is at the University of California San Diego where I’ll work on the causes of neurological disease and cancer.

“I loved my time at Nebraska, from living on east campus and being a part of a learning community to my intramural broomball team. I am the scientist I am today because of UNL.”